Pop Culture and Politics by Fay Lamb

Fay TeachingWhen I was asked to write this post, you could have knocked me over with the red beam on a laser pointer. Of course, the qualifier was, “Can you do that without it being, uh, too over the top?”

Everyone who spends any amount of time with me knows that I am opinionated politically. So, this post is going to be quite an exercise for me.

My political leanings began when I was eighteen. Literally, on my birthday. My mother issued an edict. “You will vote, and you can vote for candidates of either party. “We really only had two parties back then. Believe it or not, the Whigs weren’t around when I was eighteen.

The first thought in my pliant eighteen-year-old brain was, “Vote? I never thought of that.”

So Mom planted a seed: I could be responsible for putting someone into office. Awesome!

Remember, I said my mother issued an edict. She hadn’t pronounced it yet, but she did. While I was milling over the power a registration card would put at my voting finger, Mom said, “I don’t care what party gets your vote, you will register [keeping my promise to not go over the top by leaving out my party—you have a 50-50% chance], or you will not live under my roof.”

As tempting as getting kicked out of the home and living on my own was, I registered to vote—on the same ticket as Mom. To this day, I thank the Lord for my mother’s wisdom.

When I was eighteen, the year was 1978. Jimmy Carter was president, and whatever party you belong to, we know how that worked out; St. Paul. Minnesota became the second city to repeal its gay rights behind Miami-Dade who did the same in 1977; On November 4, 1979, fifty-two hostages were taken by Iran and held 444 days. These captives were at Iran’s mercy for the entire term of Jimmy Carter’s presidency.

At a time when one direction could benefit and another could harm our nation and impact others for years to come, voters in 1978 were placing people into office who would pass laws for their country, their states, their counties, and their cities.

Today, the vote of our young people—of every voter—is no less important than it was back then.

Americans in 2015 have to make choices which can and will impact us individually or as a nation, and now more than ever worldwide.

In 2015: Barak Obama is well into his second term as president; Americans and others have been beheaded by terrorists; a satirical newspaper in France was attacked and many died because of their cartoons depicting Islam; in Florida, the Osceola Courthouse opened at midnight using taxpayer money to do so in order to allow officials to marry same-sex couples even as the State proceeded with an appeal.

Whether one agrees with the events and actions stated above, the one truth remains, they are born from either an  indifference to politics or because the issues were taken seriously by a voter—somewhere.

American’s have a right to vote, but no matter the age, we must vote responsibly, thinking about the future of generations to come. After all, today’s voters will be my age before too long, and they’ll have to live with the consequences of their generation’s political decisions.

Thanks Fay for dropping by! As always, remember: Complete the prompt below for an extra entry in our quarterly drawings! Submit your completed writing prompt via Comments.

Today’s prompt is the photo to your left. You take it from here…Vote

 

 

The Love Boat BachelorLOVE BOAT BACHELOR Cover

Romance is a joke.

After the love of Brent Teague’s life came back into his world only to marry someone else, Brent is through with women. He might be through with being a pastor, too.

Brent was so sure that God brought Mara Adkins home to him so they could marry and live happily ever after. Six months after her wedding to another man, that theory is obviously a dud. If Brent could be so wrong about that, who’s to say he’s not mistaken about God calling him to pastoral ministry?

Tired of watching Brent flounder for direction, Brent’s feisty older sister boots him out of Spartanburg and onto a cruise ship. Brent’s old college buddy manages the ship’s staff, and he’s thrilled to finagle Brent into the role of chaplain for the two-week cruise.

As the ship sets sail, Brent starts to relax. Maybe a cruise wasn’t such a bad idea after all. But there’s just one little thing no one told him. He’s not on any ordinary cruise. He’s on The Love Boat.

What’s a sworn bachelor to do on a Caribbean cruise full of romance and love? He’ll either have to jump ship or embrace the unforgettable romantic comedy headed his way.

You can read the first eight chapters of The Love Boat Bacherlor at www.writeintegrity.com. When you do, be sure to vote for your favorite heroine. Then  you can download the Kindle free copy on … when else … Valentine’s Day and  see if your favorite heroine gets the guy.

We also have another fun contest. We’ve purposely kept the chapter authors a secret. Now, we’d like you to try to match the author with the heroine she created. If you can match all seven of the authors, you can win a full eBook catalogue of Write Integrity Press fiction.

Fay Lamb is an author, editor, and writing coach. Her emotionally charged stories remind the reader that God is always in the details. Fay has contracted three series. Stalking Willow and Better than Revenge, Books 1 and 2 in the Amazing Grace romantic suspense series are currently available for purchase. Charisse and Libby the first two novels in her The Ties That Bind contemporary romance series have been released. Fay has also collaborated on three romance novellas: The Christmas Three Treasure Hunt, A Ruby Christmas, A Dozen Apologies, and the newest adventure The Love Boat Bachelor. Her adventurous spirit has taken her into the realm of non-fiction with The Art of Characterization: How to Use the Elements of Storytelling to Connect Readers to an Unforgettable Cast.

Storms in Serenity (release February 2015), is the first novel in her Serenity Key series.

Future releases from Fay are: Everybody’s Broken and Frozen Notes, Books 3 and 4 of Amazing Grace and Hope and Delilah, Books 3 and 4 from The Ties that Bind.

Fay loves to meet readers, and you can find her on her personal Facebook page, her Facebook Author page, and at The Tactical Editor on Facebook. She’s also active on Twitter. Then there are her blogs: On the Ledge, Inner Source, and the Tactical Editor. And, yes, there’s one more: Goodreads.

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8 thoughts on “Pop Culture and Politics by Fay Lamb

  1. I think you did a great job of not going over the top, Fay. Sounds like you and I got started at the same time. Good for your mother! Even when we think our vote isn’t important in the grand scheme of things, I believe it’s important to us, individually, to be able to say we took part and voted the way we saw fit.

  2. Voting… It’s my privilege and duty.
    I wish more would do their research before checking any box!
    – – –
    Very interesting, voting is very important. I too voted as soon as I was old enough..just a few years ahead of you 🙂
    If you don’t vote – you don’t have the right to complain about what gets voted in! I feel my vote does make a difference 🙂

  3. Thank you to all those who have commented. Jennifer had me worried when she presented the topic to me, but like you, I believe that voting is a privilege. It’s one that our men in uniform have fought for us to keep, and I’m afraid that there are some in America who will not understand this freedom that we have until it is taken away from us.

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